Catabolic ≠ Anabolic Cure

How can we adapt to stress without damaging the complete, perfect, and pre-established blueprint of the human organism? How can we best address the lifestyle cause of oxidative stress (inflammation)? How can we achieve anabolic rejuvenation faster on a daily basis, before catabolic wear and tear  puts us at risk of degenerative disease, cancer, and heart attack? Finding the anabolic/ catabolic balance that restores cellular chemical balance in minutes immediately before and after acidic workouts, and whenever stress disrupts metabolic pH, may be the answer.

As a sole means of physical conditioning, SAID (Specific Adaptation to Imposed Demands), while necessary for muscle conditioning and controlling weight gain before it becomes Obesity, doesn’t  guarantee the process of aging isn’t happening just as fast. Take for example endurance and resistance workouts which depend largely on anaerobic metabolism –  they generally don’t address the catabolic effects of adrenaline fatigue, deep organ shut down, or neural, hormone and circulatory imbalances that  typically stress the immune system almost immediately (sometimes even at the thought of exercise).

Exercising with slower shorter intervals helps reduce immune stress. However the reality is we need to be able to withstand the full impact of stress at greater speeds, duration and intensity. If we are to adapt muscle cell mitochondria to use up a greater percentage of lactic acid as fuel, if we want to reach for Olympic gold, if we want to go for a run or play a game of squash, how do we reconcile adaptation with the acidification which eventually limits the full anti-aging potential of exercise? Clearly body pH acidity is implicated in free radical damage, and this must be addressed when developing any program of nutrition and exercise.

An acidic cellular environment (indicated as soon as breathing quickens during exercise), increases the probability of oxygen becoming a highly reactive and damaging free radical species, -OH. Chemical pH balance is at the root of  all physiologic processes in the body; it’s the foundation for achieving health fitness. The oxidative stress that results from disruption of body pH chemistry during physical exercise (or any kind of mental and emotional stress) can affect neural signals, gene expression, and an inflammatory reaction produces (CPR), also referred to as protein free radicals or oxidesleading to among many other things, to plaque build up in blood vessels. .

Metabolic pH acidity from excess hydrogen (H+), carbon dioxide (CO2) and lactic acid produced by muscle contraction changes the shape and function of protein cells, as well as the distribution of electrolytes necessary for optimizing the cellular action potential – except in muscle of course which hog most of the blood supply in the body (at least until the compensatory mechanisms fail). The proton gradient across the inner mitochondrial membrane is maintained by the action of the electron transport chain
. The electron transport chain consists of 6 proteins associated with the inner mitochondrial membrane.

Among the numerous theories that explain the process of aging, the mitochondrial theory of aging has received the most attention. This theory states that electrons leaking from the ETC (electron transfer chain) reduce molecular oxygen to form superoxide anion radicals. Superoxide, through both enzymic and non-enzymic reactions, can cause the generation of other ROS (reactive oxygen species). The ensuing state of oxidative stress results in damage to ETC components and mtDNAc (mitochondrial DNA), thus increasing further the production of ROS. Ultimately, this ‘vicious cycle’ leads to a physiological decline in function, or pre-mature aging. It’s been estimated that up to 2% of the oxygen used in mitochondrial respiration could end up as superoxide in unhealthy tissue.

On what basis other than the possibility of oxygen becoming a free radical, would http://www.physorg.com say… “even the simple act of breathing constantly inflicts damage upon our genes.”? Such a viewpoint comes from the premise that our default response to physical, emotion, or mental stress i.e., hyperventilation, is the sole paradigm for breathing during physical exertion. And must necessarily derive it’s logic from the assumption that the pre-established blueprint is not complete and perfect within the context of our natural environment.

Metabolic pH acidity predisposes to free radical production, cellular damage, and inflammation, no doubt. However DNA-altering protocols are not a viable solution. Either are statin drugs used to control the inflammatory reaction typical of overactivity in the sympathetic nervous system. Adverse side-effects add to modern stress that goes far beyond simple physical exertion… from exposure to high-use commercial microwave oven and man-made EMF radiation to ingestion of chemical pollutants and genetically altered food (not to mention unknown effects like nano particles on DNA). Stress causes pH acidity, and anything unnatural to the body puts us under even more stress.

Conceivably pH fitness is an option that can be easily implemented without ‘side effects’. Very good information is now available (just google pH fitness). A recent article in the journal Free Radical Biology and Medicine reports the finding of researchers at the University of California, Berkeley that supplementing with vitamin C reduces C-reactive protein, a marker of inflammation linked with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Black tea*, Indian gooseberry, Curcumin, and Omega-3 fatty acids also have anti-inflammatory properties. An alkalizing diet will help balance body pH, but not during an acidic workout, or when we’re under stress of any kind.

The trade off for exercise conditioning without pH fitness, is accelerated DNA aging. From the food we eat to the skin products we use to the type of exercise we do, even the chronic stress of working before our neuro-endocrine-organ systems are fully integrated… the resulting body pH acidity is pretty much a way of life in our fast paced world. It’s true, without deliberate exercise engineering that fits the needs of the body homeostatic-ally so precisely it renders hyperventilation unnecessary  during exercise, we have no control over a dismal aging prognosis.

Therefore a comprehensive pH fitness exercise routine which can restore H+ levels to normal with speed and ease is indispensable DNA protection. With the emergence of the Body’Fit pH Fitness™ exercise warm-up  cool down workout (short form… pHx™), it’s now possible to recharge cellular electricity and restore metabolic pH balance by building up the deep body oxygen reserves in as little as 7 minutes pre and post sports training. Even yoga or qi gong, by itself, doesn’t give the same advantage. Incidentally Body’Fit pHx resolves the circulatory imbalance inherent in both endurance and resistance training promoting vascular health.

We seem to sometimes forget that, given what it needs in terms of a true body fit, a living organism is quite capable of regenerating itself continuously… view video below for details.

*A nutrigenomics molecule which may produce similar benefits without concern for statin side effects is found in black tea. To reduce destructive inflammatory reactions which are at the root of aging and degeneration, the extract of the molecule called theoflavins has demonstrated powerful antioxidant effects and a remarkable ability to control inflammation at the genetic level. To regulate blood lipid levels Indian gooseberry or amla has produced exciting results in human clinical trials with the added benefit of reducing oxidative damage to fats that can lead to early atherosclerotic changes.

Dr Paul Clayton is immediate past Chair of the Forum on Food and Health at the Royal Society of Medicine, and Scientific Advisor to the Nutritional Therapy Council. He is a former Senior Scientific Advisor to the UK government’s Committee on the Safety of Medicines, and a visiting fellow at Oxford Brookes University. Dr Paul Clayton graduated summa cum laude in Medical Pharmacology from Edinburgh University, prior to obtaining his PhD. He lectures at the Royal College of General Practitioners and his books include Health Defence and After Atkins. He recently was invited to present his proposals on national health policy to a Government Select Committee.

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One thought on “Catabolic ≠ Anabolic Cure

  1. Pingback: Exertional Heat Stress | HealthQuiz

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